Phil’s Fudge

By October 22, 2014Dessert

Fast, healthy and delicious — all the benefits of cocoa without the refined sugar.

Step 1
Melt 2 ounces of organic 100 percent pure baking chocolate (cacao) on warm temperature.

Step 2
Turn off heat and add 1 teaspoon honey, 1 tablespoon nut butter (cashew, almond or peanut) or tahini (sesame butter), and 1/8 tsp salt.

Step 3
Mix well and pour onto parchment paper or cups, or spread onto flat buttered plate to cool. Refrigerate.

Step 4
Phil's Fudge is great plain, but you may also wish to try these options:
• Add ¼ teaspoon peppermint oil.
• Add 1 Tbl heavy cream to make it creamy.
• Almond or cashew butter center – premix very small amount of honey with the nut butter and place between thin layers of chocolate.
• Add unsweetened shredded coconut – add 2 Tbl to dry mix before blending.
• Wrap a small piece of fudge around a whole roasted coffee bean.
• Use this fudge as topping for healthy cheesecake or other desserts by making the fudge a bit thinner by adding half the amount of nut butter.
• Adjust honey to your needs.

Serves: 2
Prep: 2 minutes
Cooking: 5 minutes

  • 2 ounces unsweetened pure baking chocolate
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 tbsp nut butter of your choice
  • 1/8 tsp salt

18 Comments

  • Dan says:

    Does the chocolate have to be the solid type or can I use Cacao Powder? I don’t even know if you can melt Cacao Powder 🙂

  • Cheryl says:

    I don’t see a caloric count for these.
    Can you help me out?

  • Brian says:

    Hi Phil,

    What’s your preferred way to melt the chocolate? Double boiler? Straight in the pan?

    Thanks for all the great stuff you do.

  • Paul says:

    I keep the recipe open and use quality Cocoa power:

    Low heat (small pot, nothing special), mix 1-3tbs of Heavy Cream with some Vanilla (extract or ground), pinch of nutmeg, add 2-3tbs of butter, 1-2tbs of peanut butter and 1-2tbs of honey.
    Once melted I add cocoa usually 1/3 to 1/2 cup and occasionally add 1/4-1/2 cup of finely ground almonds and or cashews, crushed nuts, coconut flour, almond flour etc. No worries, what’s around that I can use or experiment with?
    Add in as much coconut oil as needed to make a good thick tomato paste like consistency. Add salt, 2-4 pinch. Stir more, usually the tell tale sign it’s ready is when the mix doesn’t stick to cooking pot (stainless steel). <3-5min. Place in forms or use parchment paper and form into a thin sheet. Sprinkle, some good salt (pink or sea). Cool in fridge (freezer first if impatient). To eat, plain or add some good nut butters etc. or maybe berry blended cream cheeses etc.

    After or before chilling can also add nut butters to one side, snap other half off place on top or fold and seal, making a sandwich or "pocket chocolate". Experiment.

    I find this better than any store bought chocolate

    My Keto pizza is pretty darn good too, especially the crust since most recipes lack this detail. If interested let me know.

  • Godfrey Mafekin says:

    Well, it ain’t fudge, but it sounds nice. K

  • Olivia Bevan says:

    I’m about to start the two week test and wondered if there’s anything I can use instead of honey in this recipe? Thanks so much!

  • Beth says:

    Has anyone used whole eggs dried instead of egg whites? Bought the wrong thing by mistake and don’t want it to go to waste!

  • Alison says:

    Why no stevia on the TWT? I see that you “prefer it,” but given that it doesn’t have a glycemic impact, why?

    • Hi Alison:

      The initial trigger of the insulin response, which the body uses to bring sugar into the cells, is the activation of taste buds (the ones that taste sweetness). So the sweetness of stevia or xylitol or any other non-caloric sweetener has an effect that is hormonally similar to the response you would see with caloric sweeteners (although not as large: as sugar calories are absorbed, they trigger another, larger, secondary insulin response). But since an outsize insulin response is itself part of the problem, non-caloric sweeteners aren’t “neutral” in our book.

      Given that both sugar (as a form of easy calories) and sweetness (as an indicator of the presence of sugar) are tied to the brain’s reward centers strongly enough to warrant researchers constantly warning of the addictive dangers of sugar, we speculate that many individuals may be using non-caloric sweeteners to satisfy the body’s physiological craving for sugar—indicating (we believe) a body that is still, to that degree, addicted to sugar. However, since these sweeteners have their own physiological effects (mentioned above) their continued use isn’t really a solution to the fundamental issue.

      Specifically to the TWT, we want to eliminate all the physiological responses and characteristics that typically go with a higher carb/sugar diet, among them the insulin response. So continuing with non-caloric sweeteners during this period would detract from achieving the goals of the TWT.

      Please let me know if I’ve answered your question.

  • Brenda L Niquet says:

    I found the texture of these a bit hard for my liking, when eaten from the fridge. I’ve since taken to adding 2 tablespoons of peanut butter rather than one, and the texture is much nicer! They are still firm to bite in to, but don’t feel like they’re going to break your teeth! A nice treat 🙂

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